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and stealth technology and ability to fight at supersonic speeds. it may be the way it has been able to avoid the budget cutters in washington. ha >> "washington journal," continues. host: we are talking about the roles of security cameras in asian oil security. welcome to the program. talk to us about your thoughts and feelings regarding the role of public and private cameras in national security and the impact of these cameras. seen what we have historically is that public cameras are not good at preventing crime. this has come up in the context of london and the united kingdom, which has some of the largest, most saturated cctv areas. the studies have shown that these cameras are not good for prevention purposes. the next question is are they good for solving crimes? what we have seen in london, which is one of the most saturated areas, is that the cameras are not good at solving crimes. a police steady in london shows that for every 1000 camera there was only one crime that was solved. you have a question of effectiveness. what we see is that they are not. we hear. they did not help to so
that is part of what got her into trouble. and the technology that helped track down the boston bombing suspects, and the bay area company that is stream lining the process. cutbacks at airports across the nation. n the bay area?ive flight and new details about texas fertilizer blast. what we have now >>> a key part of the search for the boston bombing suspects was the hours of video from the camcorders and the surveillance cameras along monday's race route. but how did police go through it so quickly? jonathon bloom has a look inside the bay area company whose technology helped make that possible. >> reporter: in the wake of the bombing it wasn't an eyewitness, but a high definition camera on top of a department store that told investigators who they were looking for. in a secured facility they pieced it together from vid of hundreds of other cameras to identify the suspects. it took days, but a few years ago, it could have take ep months. >> -- taken months. >> if you go to the london train bombings, it was president ared that there were thousands and thousands of investigators that o
the boat. this technology helped authorities keep a careful eye on his movements. >> we have movement in the boat. he just sat up. he's moving. flailing about. quite a bit of movement. >> reporter: they brought in a robotic device to rip open the boat's tarp. >> he'll be fully exposed. okay? >> reporter: after they got the 19-year-old out of the boat, authorities treated him right there on the scene and then sent him to beth israel hospital where he is being treated this morning, alongside the victims of the bombings. and as we all remember, when the capture was announced there were celebrations throughout boston. but there are many urgent questions that remain unanswered. bianna? >> one of those questions, were there any warning signs? in the case of the older brother, it looks like there may have been. we're learning a lot about a falling out between him and his uncle who he had briefly lived with. and this morning, we also know that the fbi interviewed him two years ago. abc's senior justice correspondent pierre thomas has been following it all from washington. good morning, pierre
your business visit thenewny.com using telemedical and mobile technologies, verizon innovators are connecting trauma surgeons to patients in the field. helping them get the attention they need, before they even reach the hospital. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. creativity. ingenuity. leadership. these are skills we see in great actors and great teachers, which america will need more of because in the next decade, over a million teachers will retire. you have what it takes to be a teacher. the more you know. >>> go ahead and bring you up to date on the latest from boston this is what we know now the victims of marathon bombings were honored this afternoon at a special ceremony at fenway park before the red sox/royals game. some want the 19-year-old suspect tried as an enemy combat tant, not a criminal defendant. 53 people remain in boston hospitals today, three of them in critical condition, including a 7-year-old girl. some of those victims are in the same hospital where the suspect is listed in serious condition. >>> the
to science, technology, engineering and math? and i'm happy to have so many key members of my science team who are here today including my chief science adviser, john holder, who's here. there's john. nih director francis collins. there's francis right there, the tall guy. we've got acting director of the national science foundation, cora merit, there's cora, and we've got real life astronaut and nasa administrator charles bolton. where's charlie? there he is right there. we need to make in this a priority, train an army of new teachers in these subject areas and to make sure that all of us as a country are lifting up these subjects for the respect that that they deserve. you know, and one of the things i'm concerned about is that as a culture, you know, we're great consumers of technology, but we're not always properly respecting the people who are in the labs and, you know, behind the scenes creating the stuff that we now take for granted. and we've got to give the millions of americans who work in science and technology not only the kind of respect they deserve, but also new ways to eng
internet corporations are willing to pay. we're joined now by technology correspondent for the "national journal," ryan fung. thank you for coming on "viewpoint." >> my pleasure. >> john: let's start off with the basics, what is the proposed purpose of cispa? >> cispa is a bill that tries to make it easier for the private sector to share information about cyber threats between it and the public sector, the government. >> john: okay. how would the passage of cispa affect the average internet user? >> well, there are a number of different ways that could happen. the key way that you alluded to is that most privacy advocates say that the bill was -- would let corporations share information that could include personal information such as e-mails or contact information to the government and critics say that the government could then use that information to spy on americans and that corporations could use that information for -- any information that the government gives to them for marketing purposes. >> john: could the corporations share this information with other corporations? >> that it co
. three more minutes until "fox & friends." ♪ using telemedical and mobile technologies, verizon innovators are connecting trauma surgeons to patients in the field. helping them get the attention they need, before they even reach the hospital. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. >> alisyn: we are rejoined by the founder of american islamic form for democracy. dr. zdudi jasser. you talk about how you wish that more law abiding, peaceful muslims would come out and condemn these things when it happened. you must have been heartened by the suspect's uncle who immediately came out and vociferously said he completely disavow what they stand for. he's disgusted by the actions and he wishes he could turn them in. if he knew where they were. is that what you are talking about? >> yeah. at the last step, absolutely, that is disheartening. they don't get radicalized overnight. they are talking about conspiracy theories and nonsense about being framed. this is easy when someone doesn't ask for the community to say he was kicked out
volume, expertise, team and of course the technology. when it comes together you have a successful surgery. >>brian: if you want successful surgery with a robot, 1-800-samadi. go to your facebook and get the ten questions. that's why you're on medical a team. straight ahead, they came to america so they could home school their children. now the united states wants to kick them out. there is a big update on this case in the next hour. plus, is that a tiger in the bathroom? yes, it is. how in the world did it get there? there? i ask you that. i think ford service is great, but i wondered what a customer thought? describe the first time you met. you brought the flex in... as soon as i met fiona and i was describing the problem we were having with our rear brakes, she immediately triaged the situation, knew exactly what was wrong with it, the car was diagnosed properly, it was fixed correctly i have confidence knowing that if i take to ford it's going to be done correctly with the right parts and the right people. get a free brake inspection and brake pads installed for just 49.95 afte
it's terrible with all the technology we have that they couldn't make a sweep of this area. they said they had bomb-sniffing dogs. job.nk it is an inside republicans can get over that nine of what happened on their watch. it will do anything to try to read it host: you are blaming this on the republican party? .aller: no i would imagine that some people in the republican party -- host: what evidence? caller: i do not have evidence but i have the evidence of previous things they did. they try to make benghazi into another 9/11. they will do anything in their power to make another 9/11 in president obama's watch. host: from the wall street journal this morning, this is what the report -- mitt am a little bit in the papers. times." "the new york writes this -- the is from mike mccall, chairman of homeland security. was quoted as saying -- also from the papers this morning, -- also from "usa today," more about the bomb -- clay in cape cod, massachusetts, go ahead -- concernedam quite about what happened, obviously. i have to tell you -- yesterday was patriots did. people forget that when
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
played a big role in the boston bombing story this week. kron four's jeff bush explains how technology helped and hurt the flow of information. >> reporter: the entire country was focused on the events in boston all week long. it was a drama that played out on every possible platform imaginable. on monday, youtube videos were uploaded shortly after the bombing. this was a big asset to detectives who were just beginning their investigation. twitter was essential with getting the word out about the bombing but also helped people reconnect with loved ones after the explosions. internet sleuths were hard at work enhancing video and still images and uploading themagain, playing a key roll in helping police figure out who the bombers were. then, on thursday, when the fbi released the photos of the bombing suspects those images were shared across all platforms of social media. at the same time, police were looking into the youtube and twitter accounts of the bombing suspects to get some insight about possible motivations. the drama intensified on the computer screen early friday morning when
by being enclosed. it's reminiscent of how efps were built in iraq when that technology came in from iran and the insurgents started using efps where they would shake the charge in such a way the charge was directed effectively, very significant piece of information. >> it sounds like it becomes a bigger bomb that you can have a small device but if it is a metal device -- >> and closed. >> -- and break apart it has a greater impact. >> when it goes off inside the sealed thing, it creates that much more pressure and when the whole thing explodes it all becomes shrapnel, if there's shrapnel in there as well, that would explain a lot. it would not have had to been, per se, an enormous explosive device. >> it's one thing to watch the picture. it's dramatic and chaotic on television, it's on the web or internet here, but it's another thing when you are steps away from where the explosion happened. that's another experience. pete crawford, he knows what it's like. he was actually mile 26 when the first bomb went off. pete is joining us now. pete, we're so glad, first of all that you're safe, th
. the first technology of its kind... mom and dad, i have great news. is now providing answers families need. siemens. answers. ♪ >>> we will find out what happened. we will find out who did this and we will bring them to justice. we also know something about us as americans and we know something about bostonians, that in the most difficult times, it's when we stand closest together. >> welcome to "morning joe." mike barnicle is still with us in boston along with katty kay in washington and joining us here on set, former senior visor to president obama and msnbc contributor, david axelrod. former mccain senior campaign strategist steve schmidt and msnbc political analyst and visiting professor at nyu, former democratic congressman, harold ford jr. good to have you all on board. we can also discuss big issue taking place on capitol hill today and that is the background checks bill. we will get to that in a moment. we begin, though, with what is on the front page of every paper that you can imagine. the bombings in boston. the three people killed in those two bombings had little in common ex
of the issues we have looked at and there are ways technology-wise to do checks. this legislation does not move in that direction. it is the opposite, prohibiting a national registry so that information about themselves are not made public and not controlled by government. they are controlled by the person who sells the gun, so therefore there is no record of gun ownership and that is specifically admitted under current law and the bills we are taking up today. the suggestion you are making is one we have had in the past. i do not think there is the legislative support to move that type of proposal, but i agree with you that it is worthy to take a look at. look at both sides had right now there is a missed trust of what government will do with that information. those answers need to be -- questions need to be answered. host: from twitter, the fact that it will not stop all people from getting guns is a weak excuse. let me put another issue on the table. you serve on the foreign affairs committee and this is the headline in the international section of "the new york times." government will do wi
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15